The cut flower of the month for December is possibly winter’s biggest, boldest, showiest bloom, the amaryllis.

 

Cut Flower of the Month for December:  Amaryllis

Cut Flower of the Month for December: Amaryllis

The amaryllis’s petals are very unusual: they look like they’re made of fabulous velvet. In terms of colour they come in white, red, yellow, pink, salmon, purple, orange and bicoloured. There are usually 4 to 6 impressive flowers on the stem. The amaryllis as a cut flower does not have any leaves, which is why it’s sometimes called ‘Naked Lady’ in America.

Cut Flower of the Month for December:  Amaryllis

Care tips for amaryllis
Enjoy amaryllises for a long time by following these tips.
•    Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
•    Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life.
•    Trim the stems diagonally with a clean and sharp knife or secateurs.
•    Regularly top the vase up with tap water.
•    The amaryllis’s stem is sometimes too weak to bear the weight of the flowers: a stake inserted in the stem is then the solution to keep it properly upright.
•     Amaryllises will last longer in a cool spot; do not place them in the sun or close to a source of heat.

Cut Flower of the Month for December:  Amaryllis

Orchids are always among the popular flowering houseplants, which makes them an easy choice for houseplant of the month for November.

Houseplant of the Month for November:  Orchid

Houseplant of the Month for November: Orchid

Orchids make up one of the largest plant families. There are more than 20,000 known species, and new ones are still being discovered regularly. In the warmer regions such as the tropical rainforest orchids often grow on trees, branches or twigs with their roots in the air. These are called epiphytic orchids. Epiphytes are plants that grow on something without drawing nutrients from it. For cultivated specimens this means that they need little water and are grown on special airy potting mixtures. This replicates nature as closely as possible.

Houseplant of the Month for November:  Orchid

Care tips for orchids
  • The care depends on the place of origin and growing style. However, most Speciality orchid species prefer room temperatures and need a light spot out of direct sunlight.
  • Orchids cannot cope with wet feet, and are often supplied in some bark as a support rather than soil. In both cases the plant should be immersed in tepid water with some orchid food for half an hour once every 10 to 14 days and left to drain thoroughly.
  • When the plant has finished flowering, the exhausted stems can be cut off just above the soil. If the plant is left in a cool spot during the rest period, some patience can result in new shoots from which new stems will emerge. Re-flowering varies according to species. Hence a Zygopetalum can flower up to 3 times a year, whilst Oncidium will only re-flower after 9 to 12 months.
  • Houseplant of the Month for November: Orchid

One of the prettiest, most versatile, and dependable of cut flowers is the flower of the month for November:  lisianthus.

Cut Flower of the Month for November:  Lisianthus

Cut Flower of the Month for November: Lisianthus

There is an enormous choice on offer: the lisianthus comes in white, green, blue, pink, lilac, purple and salmon. Some flowers even have petals with multiple colours. The lisianthus also comes in many forms: single and double flowered, large and small flowered and even with fringed petals. If that wasn’t enough, new forms are constantly being added! Apart from being colourful, the lisianthus’s petals are also very soft and delicate.

Cut Flower of the Month for November:  Lisianthus

Care tips for lisianthus
Enjoy lisianthus for a long time by following these tips.
•    Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
•    Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life. This has a very positive effect on the vase life for lisianthus in particular.
•    Cut or trim the stems diagonally by 3 to 5 cm with a sharp and clean knife or secateurs.
•    Make sure there are no leaves hanging in the water.
•    Do not place lisianthus in a draught, in full sun or near central heating.
•    Regularly top the vase up with tap water; lisianthus flowers drink a lot because they have thin petals, as a result of which they evaporate a lot of moisture.

Cut Flower of the Month for November:  Lisianthus

Probably the single most popular, longest lasting, most versatile cut flower:  chrysanthemums!

Cut Flower of the Month for October:  Chrysanthemum

Cut Flower of the Month for October: Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemums like making friends. They are easy to combine with other fabulous flowers such as roses and anthuriums to create a cheerful and extravagant bouquet. You can make the overall effect more robust by placing it in a rugged pot.

Cut Flower of the Month for October:  Chrysanthemum

Care tips for chrysanthemums
Enjoy your chrysanthemums for at least 2 to 3 weeks with the following tips.
•    Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
•    Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life.
•    Cut or trim the chrysanthemums’ stems diagonally by 3 to 5 cm with a sharp and clean knife or secateurs.
•    Make sure there are no leaves hanging in the water.
•    Do not place chrysanthemums in a draught, in full sun or near central heating.
•    Regularly top the vase up with tap water.
•    Don’t place chrysanthemums near a fruit bowl. Fruit emits ethylene gas which will cause the flowers to age more rapidly.

Cut Flower of the Month for October:  Chrysanthemum

This month’s houseplant is actually a whole category of plants, and they couldn’t be more fashionable:  hanging plants!

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The eye-catching feature of flowering hanging plants is obviously the flowers, which lend an air of mystery to these houseplants. Ideal to use as a living flower curtain or flowering room divider, the surprising appearance of this range is a good match with customers who like unusual shapes and are looking for trendy plants.

Houseplant of the Month for September: Hanging Plants

Care tips for customers

  • Green and flowering hanging plants with thick fleshy leaves need proportionally less water thanks to their succulent properties. Other species need some water every couple of days because the leaves are thinner and more fragile.
  • Most flowering hanging plants require a warm, light spot, but prefer not to hang in bright sunlight. As a rule of thumb, the more flowers there are on the plant, the greater the need for light, and the lighter/more variegated the leaves the greater the need for light as well.
  • Water the plants regularly with water which is not too cold. The soil should not be allowed to dry out, but nor should there be excess water. Spray the leaves of hanging plants with leaves regularly – don’t spray the flowers.
  • Some plant food once every 2 to 4 weeks is a good idea to keep the plant looking good for a long time. Remove exhausted flowers and old leaves, and cut the tendrils back when they get too long. Flowering hanging plants are purely for decoration and not for consumption. Houseplant of the Month for September: Hanging Plants

 

Lots of colour and texture from September 2016’s cut flower of the month:  the dahlia!

Cut Flower of the Month for September:  Dahlia

Cut Flower of the Month for September: Dahlia

The dahlia’s most eye-catching feature is its petals: sometimes evenly coloured, but often noticeably bright with spots or lines. Some flowers have a single row of petals, others have dozens – this fabulous flower has an incredible number of colour and shape variations! For example, the petals can be round, elongated or rolled. Dahlias can reach a height of 1.5 metres and a flower diameter of more than 20 cm. In other words, they are definitely eye-catching!

Flower of the Month for September:  Dahlia

Care tips for customers
•    Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
•    Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life.
•    Cut or trim the stems diagonally by 3 to 5 cm with a sharp and clean knife or secateurs.
•    Make sure there are no leaves hanging in the water.
•    Do not place dahlias in a draught, in full sun or near central heating.
•    Regularly top the vase up with tap water, because dahlias are thirsty.
•    Don’t place dahlias near a fruit bowl. Fruit emits ethylene gas which will cause the flowers to age more rapidly.

Cut Flower of the Month for September:  Dahlia

 

modern wedding table inspiration

modern wedding table inspiration

 

Vintage wedding style has ruled for nearly a decade at least, but wedding table decor is currently enjoying a more contemporary look.  Botanical, industrial, and minimalist looks are accented with lots of foliage, pops of colour, and copper and rose gold metallics.  Lots more modern table inspiration on our Pinterest board!

The flower plant of the month for August is a perennial favourite due to it’s huge blooms and range of colours:  hydrangea!

Cut Flower of the Month for August: Hydrangea

Cut Flower of the Month for August: Hydrangea

 

In the first half of the year you see red, pink, purple, white, green and blue hydrangeas, as well as hydrangeas which combine several colours. In the second half of the year there are the ‘colour-changed’ flowers. These hydrangeas have a green/dark red/brown tone and are good for drying. These are actually flowers that the grower has left to develop in the greenhouse.
There’s also plenty of choice when it comes to shape. You can choose single or double flowered varieties, globe-shaped hydrangeas, hydrangeas with small flowers in the middle and large petals on the edge (edge bloomers) or hydrangeas with a plume shape.

Cut Flower of the Month for August:  Hydrangea

Care tips for customers
•    Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
•    Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life.
•    Cut or trim the stems diagonally by 3 to 5 cm with a sharp and clean knife or secateurs.
•    Make sure there are no leaves hanging in the water.
•    Do not place hydrangeas in a draught, in full sun or near central heating.
•    Regularly top the vase up with tap water; hydrangea flowers drink a lot because they have thin leaves and thin petals, as a result of which they evaporate a lot of moisture.
•    Don’t place hydrangeas near a fruit bowl. Fruit emits ethylene gas which will cause the flowers to age more rapidly.

Cut Flower of the Month for August: Hydrangea

wedding flower inspiration using olive

wedding flower inspiration using olive

This year’s big wedding flower trend is lots and lots of foliage, including the beautiful silvery, long-leafed, light green beauty that is olive.  Perfect for all those little details, looks perfect in garlands, on cakes, even a little sprig on your dinner plate.  Check out our Pinterest board for more wedding flower inspiration using olive!

The houseplant of the month for July is a classic:  the rose!

Houseplant of the Month for July: Rose

Houseplant of the Month for July: Rose

 

Rosa is an old Latin plant name for the rose. Potted roses are part of this family, and as such they symbolise love, passion, unity and friendship. The primary association with roses is with cut flowers, but potted roses offer the same romantic mood and emotion. Roses originate from the northern hemisphere, particularly China and Europe. The name ‘rose’ is derived from the Celtic word ‘rhodd’, which means ‘red’. Many roses originally had red flowers, but growers have been able to create all sorts of other colours. Most commonly they produced the potted rose – a perfect miniature of the large shrub –   with colours such as pink, orange, yellow and white.

Houseplant of the Month for July: Rose

Care tips for customers

  • With the right care a potted rose can flower profusely for a long time. The plant prefers a light spot both indoors and outdoors, and cannot cope with drying out: the soil should always be slightly damp.
  • Plant food or special rose food is recommended once every two to three weeks to keep it flowering profusely for a long time.
  • Carefully remove exhausted flowers. Make sure that the buds are thereby not damaged.
  • When the plant has finished flowering indoors, the potted rose can be pruned back to approx. five centimetres above the soil and be planted in a bed outdoors or be placed in a pot on the balcony or patio. The potted rose will then flower vigorously again as a garden rose after about two months.
  • When used as a garden plant, the potted rose can be pruned in February down to 5 cm above the ground. The plant will then flower outdoors from May to October.

Houseplant of the Month for July: Rose