Flower of the Month for March:  Freesia

Flower of the Month for March: Freesia

Origin of the freesia
The tuberous freesia was ‘discovered’ in South Africa, where it was called ‘Cape lily-of-the-valley’. The flower was given the name ‘Freesia’ around 1830 by the South African botanist Ecklon, who named it after his friend, the German Dr F. Freese.
Did you know that a freesia’s flower display is called a comb because of the way the flower buds are lined up so neatly?

The freesia’s colours, shapes and fragrances
The freesia’s tuber forms small tubers under the soil called beads. These beads grow into a full tuber and ultimately into a comb with flowers, which lends extra style to any home. And freesias even carry on growing merrily in the vase! The freesia can be single or double flowered and comes in white, yellow, orange, red, blue, pink and purple, but can also be bicoloured or multicoloured. Many varieties have a beautiful sweet scent which makes freesias even more attractive.

Care tips for customers
Give your customers the following tips in order to ensure they enjoy their freesias to the fullest.
• Select a clean vase and fill it with tap water at room temperature.
• Add cut flower food to the water for a longer vase life.
• Trim the stems diagonally by 3 to 5 cm with a sharp clean knife or secateurs.
• Don’t place freesias in a draught, in full sun or near central heating.
• Regularly top the vase up with tap water.
• Don’t place freesias near a fruit bowl. Fruit emits ethylene gas which will cause the flowers to age more rapidly.
The freesia symbolises unconditional love. Traditionally you give white freesias to your spouse after seven years of marriage as a reminder of pure, genuine love. The beautiful fragrance of the comb of flowers lends an extra dimension to this. The freesia also symbolises innocence.

Flower of the Month for March:  Freesia

Bloomsday Flowers Christmas Shopping Night 2015

Join us once again for our annual Christmas shopping night!

Enjoy holiday nibbles and drinks while you shop, with 20% off all giftware and decorations all day. Christmas flower arranging workshop from 7-9pm, choose your trimmings and let our florists help you create a holiday candle arrangement.

For more information ring 021 428 7404.

Wedding favour inspiration and ideas by Bloomsday Flowers

Wedding favour inspiration and ideas by Bloomsday Flowers

Favours are an easy way to bring a bit of extra floral decor to your wedding tables using something you’re already spending on anyway!  Lots of good ideas from milk bottle or jam jar arrangements, potted succulents or flowering plants, or even just add a sprig to your favour packaging.  Get inspired by our wedding favour Pinterest board!

Wedding chair inspiration by Bloomsday Flowers

Wedding chair inspiration by Bloomsday Flowers

If you only add one extra touch to your wedding ceremony, the most effective by far is to add flowers to your wedding chairs.  All of your guests will have their eyes glued to the back of those two chairs making it the perfect spot to tie in your floral theme.  A couple of inexpensive bunches tied with lace or raffia is enough, instantly charming!  Lots of chair decor ideas over on our Pinterest board.

Bloomsday Flowers shop front

We have been painting and decorating here at the shop! Fresh coat of paint on the front of the shop and gorgeous new hanging baskets and brackets, also painting shelves and units inside in sunny bright colours!

Giving the workbench at fresh colour!

Bloomsday Flowers shop floor

Bloomsday Flowers hanging baskets

Bloomsday Flowers sink and dresser

Flower Pot decor inspiration by Bloomsday

Flower Pot decor inspiration by Bloomsday

Flower pots are a cheap and cheerful way of adding pretty home decor touches.  Use brand new, add some chippy paint, leave outside for a natural patina, or dedorate with lace or old book pages, use your imagination!  Add a pretty flowering plant and you’ve got an arrangement that will last weeks or longer.  Lots of other pot plant ideas on our Pinterest board!

July 2015: the Ficus Ginseng is Houseplant of the month

July 2015: the Ficus Ginseng is Houseplant of the month

The name Ficus is Latin for fig. The Ficus grows in (sub) tropical areas of Asia, Africa, South America and Australia. The Ficus Ginseng is unique in the Ficus range. The plant is recognised by its green leaves with a blunt leaf tip.  The plants are often sold as bonsai.

The Ficus Ginseng likes a light position out of the full sun. The lighter the position, the more water it will need, so give it regular water and don’t let the root ball dry out. The plant can even stand outside for a while in the summer, as long as the temperature doesn’t drop below 12-15 degrees Celsius. Give it less water in the winter and not at all between 12-15 degrees Celsius. The consumer can remove yellow, brown or damaged leaves and can prune the plant in the darker months, to keep the Ficus in shape. The roots don’t need to be pruned.

Call in to see our selection of these and other gorgeous houseplants!

Vintage books wedding decor inspiration by Bloomsday

Vintage books wedding decor inspiration by Bloomsday

Vintage books are great items for wedding table decor:  they’re cheap, easy to find, and come in lots of colours!  Great for stacking and bringing height to your table centers, we love to pop our jam jar arrangements on top.  Lots of wedding decor inspiration on our vintage book Pinterest board!

Sweet William wedding flower inspiration by Bloomsday

Sweet William wedding flower inspiration by Bloomsday

My favourite flower for 2015/16 is Sweet William.  Sweet William is a dianthus and has the same strength and long vase life of his big sister the carnation.  Great value as it is often grown outdoors, it is on the market throughout the summer and is at home in a jam jar or a bridal bouquet, bringing it’s sweet little charm to all arrangements.  Lots more Sweet William inspiration on our Pinterest board!

 

 

June 2015: the Peace Lily is Houseplant of the month

June 2015: the Peace Lily is Houseplant of the month

The official name of the Peace Lily, Spathiphyllum, is derived from the Greek words for spathe and leaf. The plant has received extra attention over the last few years through the NASA Clean Air Study. They were researching how to purify the air in space stations and the Peace Lily turned out to purify air better than the average plant.

The Peace Lily is an easy care plant. The plant prefers a light position, out of the bright sunshine with a temperature of 18-22 °C. Give the plant regular lukewarm water. If the leaves are starting to wilt, the root ball has dried out. The plant loves a regular spray with lukewarm water, as well as plant food.  Regular removal of dead flowers is also recommended. To bring the plant into flower year after year, a winter rest period is necessary. Place the plant in an area with a temperature of around 15 °C, for six to eight weeks in a light position and it will soon flourish again. In the summer, the plant can go in the garden or on the patio, but watch out for bright sun.

We have a selection of Peace Lilies in the shop, call in to have a look at these beautiful, easy-to-care-for plants!